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greenAlps

The greenAlps project was based on the Econnect and recharge.green projects, amongst others. From 2008 to 2011 Econnect investigated how ecological network in the Alpine space could be improved via concrete measures and gave already concrete policy recommendations. The recharge.green project is developing instruments to evaluate biodiversity and the services of ecosystems in the Alps in relation to the production of renewable energy.

The greenAlps project has involved the major networks of NGOs, protected areas and research organisations in the Alps. The applicability of the strategic results and their transferability to European level was tested in pilot areas that represented very different regions of the Alps: the National Parks of Triglav (SIovenia), Kalkalpen and Gesäuse (Austria) and Berchtesgaden (Germany) and the Prealpi Giulie Nature Park (Italy).

The lead partner of greenAlps was ALPARC, the Alpine Network of Protected Areas, further seven partners were involved. CIPRA International was, as project partner, responsible for public relations and was supporting all project partners in the realisation of public events and in their media work. The network of municipalities "Alliance in the Alps" and the “Alpine Town of the Year” association had, as observers, contributed their experiences and needs at local level. The work of CIPRA International has been financed by the gouvernment of Liechtenstein and the Paul Schiller foundation.

www.greenalps-project.eu

Press release on the results of the greenAlps project

Final publications of the project

Final booklet: Connecting mountains, people, nature – Shaping the framework for an efficient European biodiversity policy for the Alps (English, printed and download): This publication gives an overview on the project results.

Staking a claim for nature – Policy recommendations for the Alpine Space (available in 5 languages, printed and download): This publication recommends ways in which decision makers can implement biodiversity policies more effectively.

All final publications