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CIPRA positions

Alpine rivers are not renewable

May 14, 2014
Alpine rivers are not renewable

Towards a fully sustainable energy strategy in the Alps

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Healthy, natural forests: responding to climate change! cc.alps: CIPRA's demands for forest management

Mar 20, 2012
Healthy, natural forests: responding to climate change! cc.alps: CIPRA's demands for forest management

As forestry measures have long-term effects, adaptation of the forests to new climate conditions is urgently needed - but it should be initiated with great caution. The carbon storage ability of forests has to be exploited. Wood should first be used as a raw and building material; only under certain circumstances it should be used for heating. Short regional exploitation cycles are to be created. Natural forests should be fostered as they are more resilient to climate change. Forest owners who in the interest of climate protection give up part of their earnings should be compensated. Finally targeted research into practical climate adaptation measures has to become an important long-term task.

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Improvements in efficiency instead of damage to the environment! cc.alps: CIPRA's demands on the subject of water

Dec 23, 2011
Improvements in efficiency instead of damage to the environment! cc.alps: CIPRA's demands on the subject of water

The rivers of the Alps provide 170 million people with water. Climate change will greatly reduce the availability of water in the Alps and beyond, with less rain, longer dry periods in summer and greatly reduced snowfalls in winter among the predicted consequences. The demands made of this natural resource will increase accordingly, as will competition between the various user groups. Today only about 10% of the rivers and streams of the Alps can be considered ecologically intact, i.e. they are neither polluted nor over-engineered nor compromised in terms of their flow regimes. The ecological quality of waterways and related habitats therefore calls for improvement, not further impairment. We cannot permit the last rivers to become engineered structures or depleted by the excessive abstraction of water.

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cc.alps: CIPRA's demands for agriculture

Aug 04, 2011
cc.alps: CIPRA's demands for agriculture

The agricultural sector is directly affected by climate change impacts but it also contributes to the release of greenhouse gases (GHG) and rising concentrations of GHG in the atmosphere. A sustainable climate response strategy in the field of agriculture involves anticipating, planning and long-term thinking from farm level to transnational level. Prominent fields of activity are sustainable land and soil management, sustainable water management, managing manure and soil carbon as well as organic agriculture as an overall strategy. As agriculture is a highly subsidized economic sector, subvention policy can be used as a lever to guide the sector to sustainability and climate neutrality.

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cc.alps: CIPRA Demands on Nature Protection

Nov 04, 2009
cc.alps: CIPRA Demands on Nature Protection

When climate changes, nature feels it. Mountain areas are particularly sensitive, and the greatest losses in terms of plant and animal species may occur precisely there. According to scientific estimates, almost every second plant species in the Alps is threatened with extinc-tion by 2100. For the flora with the highest number of varieties in Central Europe this would be an enormous loss. Because of global warming, also well-known animal species such as the Alpine ibex, the snow grouse and the mountain hare will experience far worse living con-ditions in the Alps.

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Declaration on protected areas in European mountain regions, Chambéry 2002

Nov 15, 2002
Declaration on protected areas in European mountain regions, Chambéry 2002

The Declaration on Protected Areas in European Mountain Regions emphasises the significance of biological and geological resources and water reserves in mountain regions. It stresses the necessity of targeted development and conservation measures as well as regional co-operation. Protected areas can serve as an experimental field for the development of conservation measures. Concrete steps proposed for the period 2003-2005 include the creation, in each European massif, of a mountain co-operation committee with representatives of governmental and non-governmental organisations. One of the tasks of the committees is to help disseminate information about models and methods to implement nature conservation and to transfer knowledge from research to improve the management of protected areas and sustainable development. Other important factors include encouraging partnerships, networks and joint projects as well as developing strategies for the active participation of populations.

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